Contribute to the Integration of Africa RISING (AR) Activities into Coherent Project Programmes

In collaboration with AR partners, contribute to the integration of R&D activities at project level and the joint planning & implementation of activities. This may include the following:

• In collaboration with Internal Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), plan and carry out nutrient analysis of crop residues suitable as animal feed such as broad beans residues and wheat straw (led by ILRI)

• In collaboration with International Center for tropical agriculture (CIAT), follow up on value chain work on priority crops and livestock and contribute to the development of value chain activities (led by CIAT)

• In collaboration with International Water Management Institute (IWMI), explore the use of small scale irrigation facilities for the production of high value crops such as potato during off season periods (led by IWMI)

• Identification and exploitation of potential synergies between International Potato Center’s (CIP) AR component and the Humid Tropics program

• Explore opportunities with International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) and national partners to initiate joint system level research and development (R&D) activities.


About the project

Project title: Contribute to the integration of AR activities into coherent project programmes

Project abstract

In 2014, participatory community analyses (PCA) were undertaken by multi-disciplinary facilitation teams in 8 kebeles in the Amhara, Tigray, Oromia and SNNPR regions, producing a list of priority farming enterprises, their current bottlenecks, as well as farmer-perceived opportunities for improving income, food security and/or reducing overall risks by intensifying farm enterprises. The PCA was carried out in discussions with kebele members and local leaders, with over 250 men, women and young people. Feedback on the results will be given to the farmers and future participatory planning and implementation of activities based on the results of the PCA and feedback sessions.

Project website: http://africa-rising.net

Project start date: 01/01/2014

Project end date : 12/31/2014

Promotion of Diffused Light Storage

This dataset includes constructed diffused light storage (DLS) number.

About the project

Project title: Promotion of Diffused Light Storage

Project abstract

Storage losses including impaired quality are partly caused by harvested crops not being stored in a product specific manner. Diffused Light Storage (DLS) is a post-harvest technology which uses natural indirect light instead of low temperature to control excessive sprout growth of potato seeds, extend their storage life, reduce the associated storage losses and improve productivity of the potato crop. It is a low cost method which provides a new opportunity for farmers to preserve the quality of seed potato. Quality Declared Planting Material (QDPM) is a value added product and must be stored in DLS.

Project website: http://africa-rising.net

Project start date: 01/01/2014

Project end date : 06/01/2014

Analysis of Soil Related Constraints for Sustainable Intensification

FAO estimates that agricultural intensification contributes about 80% of increased crop production in developing countries. Thus sustainable intensification (SI) will require, among other things, better use of land resources upon which production depends. This is critical given that most of the arable land in Africa has soil related problems, leading losses of nutrients and land cover (Heng et al. 2015). In this context improved land management is critical to overcoming soil related constraints to sustainable food production and in targeting agricultural interventions. However, limited availability of site-specific nutrient management guidelines for semi-arid zones in Tanzania undermines efforts to target technologies in the specific biophysical conditions in which smallholder farmers operate. Thus technologies adopted under these circumstances are risky as they may fail to address key drivers of enhanced crop production or land degradation. We characterized soils in Kongwa and Kiteto districts to assess fertility status and drivers of land degradation so as to inform the development of integrated land management options for SI under the Africa RISING project. This approach helps to link soil management recommendations to soil conditions and in targeting interventions./p>

About the project

Project title: Africa RISING- Intensification of Maize-Legume Based Systems in the Semi-Arid Areas of Tanzania to Increase Farm Productivity and Improve Farming Natural Resource Base

Project abstract

The aim of the Africa RISING project in Kongwa and Kiteto Districts, Tanzania is to provide a scientific basis for sustainably intensifying agricultural production in semi-arid areas of central Tanzania. The project activities are falls under 4 thematic areas that address three critical elements of sustainable intensification (SI), i.e. genetic, ecological and socio-economic intensification technologies. The scope of activities being implemented includes packaging of new legume and cereal varieties with over 120% yield advantage, packaging and validation of integrated productivity enhancing technologies for cereals, legumes, legume trees and soil health technologies, food safety primarily to reduce aflatoxin contamination and integration of livestock into the cropping systems. The innovation platform is used to set R4D priority in the active sites. In the 2013-2014 season, we reached out to about 1217 farmers Kongwa and Kiteto districts. In 2014 we plan to reach out to about 1500 new farmers. The project team is comprised of national partners (e.g. ARI-Hombolo, District Agricultural Officers, SUA and UDOM) and CG Partners (CIMMYT and ICRAF) under the leadership of ICRISAT.

Project website: http://africa-rising.net

Project start date: 05/1/2012

Project end date : 09/30/2016

Ghana Focus Group Discussions Data: Dataset

A series of focus group discussions (FGDs) to elicit the local knowledge about the agricultural and wild biodiversity present in the study areas in order to generate: (a) an inventory (list) of all useful plant, and animal species used by local communities for human food, animal feed, medicine, fuel, housing, farming tools, etc. and their local names; (b) an inventory of all foods consumed; (c) an inventory of species and products bought and sold in markets that people in the village attend. Two FGDs per village in three villages. FGDs were held separately for men and women in order to collect gender disaggregated data. Geographic area includes: Three villages in the Lawra District of Ghana: Bonpari (Lat 10.67, Lon W002.81); Gbelinkaa (Lat N10.58, Lon W002.83); Yagtuur (Lat N10.55, Lon W 002.86) In each of the three villages, two focus group discussions were held separately. One with men and the other with women. Each group will deal with the three aspects for discussion: Useful biological diversity in the production system; Market diversity; and Dietary diversity. There were between 10-16 participants in each group. Each group tried to include a cross-section of individuals involved in agricultural production or at least collecting useful plants from common lands and the wild, representing different levels of access to land (land owners, local land renters and migrant land renters), different ethnic groups present in the village and different age groups (special emphasis should be placed to include younger farmers). For each group there were two facilitators, one to guide the exercise and the other to document the process (take notes, photographs, etc.). The data were elicited using the four-square methodology explained in the Protocol document

Rajasthan Focus Group Discussions Data: Dataset

A series of focus group discussions (FGDs) to elicit the local knowledge about the agricultural and wild biodiversity present in the study areas in order to generate: (a) an inventory (list) of all useful plant, and animal species used by local communities for human food and their local names; (b) an inventory of all foods consumed; (c) an inventory of markets that people in the village attend. "In each of the eight villages, one focus group discussion was held, but including both men and women participants. Each group will deal with the three aspects for discussion: Useful biological diversity in the production system; Market diversity; and Dietary diversity. There were between 10-16 participants in each group. Each group tried to include a cross-section of individuals involved in agricultural production or at least collecting useful plants from common lands and the wild, representing different levels of access to land (land owners, local land renters and migrant land renters), different ethnic groups present in the village and different age groups (special emphasis should be placed to include younger farmers). For each group there were two facilitators, one to guide the exercise and the other to document the process (take notes, photographs, etc.). The data were elicited using the four-square methodology explained in the Protocol document." Eight villages of three districts were surveyed: (Balmer, Jaisalmer and Jodhpur) in the State of Rajasthan: Damodara (26°54′,70°43′); Deda (26°94′,70°43′); Dedhu, (27°20′, 71°45′); Dhirasar (25°27′, 71°11′); Dhok (25°29′, 71°01′); Govindupura (26°49′, 73°05′); Mansagar (26°45′, 73°08′); Meghwalo Ki Dhani (27.3711° N, 72.2334° E, this village was not part of the household survey)

Niger Focus Group Discussion Data: Dataset

A series of focus group discussions (FGDs) to elicit the local knowledge about the agricultural and wild biodiversity present in the study areas in order to generate: (a) an inventory (list) of all useful plant, and animal species used by local communities for human food, animal feed, medicine, fuel, housing, farming tools, etc. and their local names; (b) an inventory of all foods consumed; (c) an inventory of species and products bought and sold in markets that people in the village attend. Two FGDs per village in three villages. FGDs were held separately for men and women in order to collect gender disaggregated data. In each of the three villages, two focus group discussions were held separately. One with men and the other with women. Each group will deal with the three aspects for discussion: Useful biological diversity in the production system; Market diversity; and Dietary diversity. There were between 10-16 participants in each group. Each group tried to include a cross-section of individuals involved in agricultural production or at least collecting useful plants from common lands and the wild, representing different levels of access to land (land owners, local land renters and migrant land renters), different ethnic groups present in the village and different age groups (special emphasis should be placed to include younger farmers). For each group there were two facilitators, one to guide the exercise and the other to document the process (take notes, photographs, etc.). The data were elicited using the four-cell analysis methodology explained in the Protocol document

Mali Focus Group Discussions Data: Dataset

A series of focus group discussions (FGDs) to elicit the local knowledge about the agricultural and wild biodiversity present in the study areas in order to generate: (a) an inventory (list) of all useful plant, and animal species used by local communities for human food, animal feed, medicine, fuel, housing, farming tools, etc. and their local names; (b) an inventory of all foods consumed; (c) an inventory of species and products bought and sold in markets that people in the village attend. Two FGDs per village in three villages. FGDs were held separately for men and women in order to collect gender disaggregated data In each of the three villages, two focus group discussions were held separately. One with men and the other with women. Each group will deal with the three aspects for discussion: Useful biological diversity in the production system; Market diversity; and Dietary diversity. There were between 10-16 participants in each group. Each group tried to include a cross-section of individuals involved in agricultural production or at least collecting useful plants from common lands and the wild, representing different levels of access to land (land owners, local land renters and migrant land renters), different ethnic groups present in the village and different age groups (special emphasis should be placed to include younger farmers). For each group there were two facilitators, one to guide the exercise and the other to document the process (take notes, photographs, etc.). The data were elicited using the four-square methodology explained in the Protocol document. The three villages survey were in the Sikasso District of Mali: Fakoro (Lat 12°13074, Lon 005°20156); Kani (Lat 12°15011, Lon 005°10827); N’goutjina (Lat 12°17961, Lon 005°28372)

Replication Data for: Marando Bora Project Baseline Survey

The Marando Bora (MB) project was implemented by the International Potato Center (CIP) in collaboration with 12 other partners in the Lake Zone region, Tanzania from October 2009 to June 2012. The project’s aim was to improve the quantity and quality of food for 150,000 Tanzanian households in the Lake Zone region by strengthening the availability and accessibility of quality planting material of improved and local sweetpotato varieties. The specific objectives of the MB project were to provide: i) high yielding and consumer preferred sweetpotato varieties; ii) orange-fleshed sweetpotato (OSFP) varieties with adequate supplies of beta-carotene to tackle Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) problem; iii) disease free planting materials for increased root and vine production; iv) timely access to vines for early planting; v) training for decentralized vines multipliers (DVMs) and farmers about vines conservation and maintenance of vine quality; vi) communication products to enhance awareness about benefits of using disease-free vines, benefits of OFSP varieties, and sources of quality sweetpotato vines. The MB project’s theory of change (TOC) was to improve food and nutrition security and enhance farmers’ incomes by implementing several activities including production and distribution of clean planting materials; training farmers’ about vines conservation; training of farmer multipliers and provision of improved white and orange fleshed SP varieties among others.
The Marando Bora Baseline survey objective was to address the main problems associated with sweetpotato vine availability and distribution by developing a sustainable seed system for sweetpotato. It used voucher and mass distribution strategies to address these problems. Using decentralized vine multipliers in the communities and mass distribution, the project ensured timely access to planting vines at the beginning of the rainy season.

Monitoring of Market Prices, Characterization of Value Chains, Cost and Benefit Analysis, and Adoption Evalutaion

This research aims (1) monitor the market prices on quarterly basis in Bougouni and Koutiala, (2) make a comparative analysis of on-farm trials conducted in intervention zones of the project, (3) value chain analysis of main crops, and (4) make an adoption evaluation of technologies promoted by the project in Bougouni and Koutiala districts.

About the project

Project title: Research Program on Soil & Water Management

Project abstract


As part of the Feed the Future Initiative, the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) is supporting an innovative multi-stakeholder agricultural research program, the Africa Research in Sustainable Intensification for the Next Generation (Africa RISING). The program’s main objective is to identify and validate scalable options for the sustainable intensification of key African cereal-based farming systems to increase food production and improve the livelihoods of smallholder farmers and at the same time conserve or improve the natural resource base.

Project website: http://africa-rising.net

Project start date: 2011-01-01

Project end date : 2016-12-31