Dataset for: Nutritious Orange-Fleshed Sweetpotat (OFSP) For Niassa – Baseline Household Survey

Relevant information on the challenges and opportunities of the project were considered for the benefit of the project results. In fact, most of the findings from the study were used as the baseline reference for evaluating the impact of the project’s intervention in the project target areas three years later, including activities on seed system, crop sales, marketing, nutrition and food security in general.
This baseline survey was conducted between from July 8 to August 23, 2013, and overall, 396 households were visited in 24 villages distributed across the 8 districts surveyed. Overall, about 90% of the farmers interviewed in the present study had agriculture as the most important activity. Among the farmers who mentioned sweetpotato, only about 12% of the households produced OFSP due to earlier dissemination efforts by IIAM and partners. However, only 2.3% of households’ total landholding was under sweetpotato, while 1.3% was plated with OFSP. Although the high number of farmers producing sweetpotatoes, the area under production is relatively small, with an average of 300 m2 per household. In general, sweetpotato was mostly (79%) produced for consumption, while 21% of the interviewees mentioned the sale.
Overall, farmer-to-farmer exchange of planting material was the most important source of sweetpotato planting material. Most farmers obtain sweetpotato planting material from their own plots (69%). However, some considerable farmers depend on vines from neighbors (23%), and about 7% from relatives. There was not any reference related to the selling of planting material. In seed system, vine conservation is one of the critical activities during the sweetpotato production cycle. Vines must be read for planting even after a long dry season. According to the results from this study, most (65%) of sweetpotato is planted 2-3 after the beginning of the raining season. At this moment, vines must be ready for planting. In general, the majority (94%) of sweetpotato farmers usually conserve their vines. The typical methods of conservation include leave some portions of the plot without harvesting (60%) for later sprouting, establish small fenced plots in lowlands (28%), and conservation in small plots near their houses (15%).
Important to note was the fact that most of the selling of the fresh roots was conducted in local marketplaces (64%) as opposed to the farm gate (6%). This means that most of the farmers had to transport their products to local markets and other places in the urban (30%) areas to sell their produce.
Vitamin A knowledge, farmers’ practices, attitude and perception on sweetpotato was further assessed. One of the most important objectives of this project is to address vitamin A deficiency through the consumption of OFSP. Overall, both male (70%) and female (66%) have heard about vitamin A. Although not important, in general, the results indicate that there were slightly more men than women informed about vitamin A among the respondents of this study. The most important source vitamin A information for the women was the health unit (50%), while for the men was the radio (44%) program aired in local language. In general, the use of radio with programs in local languages is more effective for men than women, while, most of the women can be effectively reached by using the heath unit.

Crop improvement, adoption and impact of improved bean varieties in Sub Saharan Africa

The crop improvement research effort of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) centers and their national agricultural research systems (NARS) partners has had a large impact on world food production. Although bean impact has been documented in a number of past studies, the last comprehensive study of the international crop improvement effort, organized by the Standing Panel for Impact Assessment (SPIA, formerly the Impact Assessment and Evaluation Group), was based on data collected a decade ago (Evenson and Gollin, 2003 based on 1997-98 data). Important changes have occurred in the funding and conduct of the international crop improvement effort and in the general climate for agriculture in the developing world since the completion of the Evenson and Gollin study.
The level and focus of funding for research in the NARS and in the CGIAR centers have fluctuated greatly, and the role of the private sector has evolved. Yet, the importance of the CGIAR/NARS crop improvement effort in feeding the world is arguably as important today as it has been at any time in history. The steady uptake and turnover of crop varieties is fundamental to realizing a Green Revolution in Africa, and it is still important for helping achieve income growth for numerous poor rural households. But our present understanding of improved variety adoption—by crop, by location, by adopter and by source—is limited in Africa.
The data seeks to redress this anomaly, by providing a versatile database on bean variety adoption by crop, by location, by adopter and by source in sub-saharan countries. The following countries are covered: Burundi, DRCongo, Ethiopia, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia.

Crop improvement, adoption and impact of improved bean varieties in Sub Saharan Africa

The crop improvement research effort of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) centers and their national agricultural research systems (NARS) partners has had a large impact on world food production. Although bean impact has been documented in a number of past studies, the last comprehensive study of the international crop improvement effort, organized by the Standing Panel for Impact Assessment (SPIA, formerly the Impact Assessment and Evaluation Group), was based on data collected a decade ago (Evenson and Gollin, 2003 based on 1997-98 data). Important changes have occurred in the funding and conduct of the international crop improvement effort and in the general climate for agriculture in the developing world since the completion of the Evenson and Gollin study.
The level and focus of funding for research in the NARS and in the CGIAR centers have fluctuated greatly, and the role of the private sector has evolved. Yet, the importance of the CGIAR/NARS crop improvement effort in feeding the world is arguably as important today as it has been at any time in history. The steady uptake and turnover of crop varieties is fundamental to realizing a Green Revolution in Africa, and it is still important for helping achieve income growth for numerous poor rural households. But our present understanding of improved variety adoption—by crop, by location, by adopter and by source—is limited in Africa.
The data seeks to redress this anomaly, by providing a versatile database on bean variety adoption by crop, by location, by adopter and by source in sub-saharan countries. The following countries are covered: Burundi, DRCongo, Ethiopia, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia.

Dataset for: Baseline Survey for the OFDA 2016 Mitigating Drought Impacts on Livelihoods in Mozambique through Resilient, Nutritious Sweetpotato Project in the South of Mozambique

This dataset was carried out as the baseline survey for the Mitigating Drought Impacts in Southern Mozambique Through Resilient, Nutritious Sweet potato Project that has been implemented in 13 districts in the southern of Mozambique, namely Matutuine, Boane, Moamba, and Magude in Maputo province, Guija, Mabalane, Massangena, Chigubo, Chiculalacuala, and Mapai in Gaza province, and Funhalouro, Mabote and Govuro in Inhambane province.Primary data of about 1,200 households were collected in all 13 project target districts. The sample size was estimated using the multistage sampling method.
Overall, most of the household demographics were consistent with the findings from the household budget survey 2014/15 carried out by INE in the targeted areas. The number of household members was on average 5. Almost 58% of the households visited during this exercise had a child under 5 years, with an average of two years. The average age of the household heads was 50 years, and most of them had a third-grade education level. Overall, while about 36% of the household heads were women, almost 50% of the household members were female.
The recurrent and extreme events such as floods, droughts, cyclones, extreme temperatures and others are generally the causes of the disruptions of the local cropping systems and in the end food and nutrition insecurity in most of the regions in Mozambique. To better continue to understand and build resilience to these drought related events, some of the climate change related events were evaluated. Overall, 79% of the respondents directly faced droughts related effects at least once in the last five years, 11% already faced the cyclones, and 10% were affected by floods. The districts Mabote (97%), Funhalouro (90%), Massangena (89%), and Chicualacuala (86%) had highest proportion of respondents who have suffered from droughts effects in the last five years. About 22% and 20% of respondents faced floods in Chigubo and Mabalane respectively. Moamba presented relatively higher proportion (17%) of respondents who also were affected by cyclones.
In relation to the damage and effects caused by droughts, almost 44% of the respondents mentioned the loss of their crops, about 28% had their fields destroyed, and nearly 23% had lost their animals by death. Matutuine presented highest proportion of respondents with the crop loss (53%), while Boane had the highest proportion of the respondents with fields destroyed (45%). The district of Chigubo had the highest proportion of animals’ death (31%).

Reaching end users (REU) socioeconomic endline survey 2009, Mozambique

Between 2006 and 2009, HarvestPlus conducted the Reaching End Users (REU) project in Mozambique and Uganda. The objective of the project was to distribute the first biofortified crop with high micronutrient density, provitamin A-rich orange-fleshed sweet potato (OFSP). HarvestPlus selected regions of Uganda and Mozambique for this initiative because in these areas of each country white- or yellow-fleshed sweet potato is either the staple crop (Uganda) or an important secondary source of starch (Mozambique). The project strategy involved conducting a coordinated three-pronged approach to encourage adoption and consumption of OFSP including: (i) vine distribution and agricultural extension (seed systems), (ii) demand creation through nutrition trainings; and (iii) trainings in marketing and product development. HarvestPlus planned to reach over 10,000 farming household in each country, but also wanted to use this opportunity to learn about how the impact and cost-effectiveness of integrated dissemination strategies of differing intensity. The data were used for a rigorous impact evaluation and cost-effectiveness study of the REU OFSP project conducted from 2006-2009 in Mozambique, and the 2012 data were collected to understand how adoption and dietary intakes had evolved.

HarvestPlus collaborated with the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) and the International Potato Center (CIP) to design and implement a randomized-controlled evaluation during the implementation of the REU project in each country. The point of intervention for the REU project included local farmer groups in Uganda and more loosely organized community or church-based groups in Mozambique. Before the intervention, these groups were sampled for the evaluation study and group members with young children were randomly selected for the evaluation household sample. Baseline surveys were conducted in the sampled church groups in Mozambique in 2006. The baseline included a detailed socioeconomic and agricultural survey as well as a nutrition and dietary intake survey. The dietary intake survey included 24-hour dietary recall interviews to measure intakes of vitamin A and other nutrients of target groups of young children and women in the sample. As a basis for identifying impact through the evaluation, sampled farmer groups or church groups were randomly assigned into one of three intervention arms: the intensive 2-3 year intervention (Model 1), a less intensive intervention with reduced activity after the first year (Model 2) and a Control group. In 2009, endline surveys were conducted in Mozambique, and in 2012, the communities were visited a third time, three years after the intervention had left.

Dataset for: The Viable Sweetpotato Technologies in Africa (VISTA)-Mozambique: Endline survey for Nampula and Zambezia Provinces

The endline survey for Viable Sweetpotato Technologies in Africa (VISTA) project in Mozambique was conducted in November-December, 2018 in 15 districts: 11 in Nampula province (11 districts in Nampula Province (Nampula City, Rapale, Murrupula, Malema, Mecuburi, Meconta, Monapo, Mogovolas, Moma, Larde and Angoche) and 4 in Zambezia Province (Alto Molocue, Gurue, Mocuba and Gile). The survey covered 1, 538 households from these 15 districts. A multi-stage sampling procedure was used in selecting households for the study. The first stage involved stratifying the 15 districts into two strata: the pilot districts that were first to be exposed to the intervention from 2014 and the expansion districts that were exposed from 2016. The second stage involved the random selection of the intervention and control villages from the list that was identified by the project staff and local agriculture and health extension officers at the beginning of the project. Once the villages were selected, the households from these villages who were among the 2,955 households interviewed during a baseline survey in 2015 and follow-up survey in 2017 were listed to create as the sampling frame from which the 1,538 households for the 2018/19 survey were randomly selected. This way, the households interviewed in previous surveys were revisited in the 2018/19 survey providing the opportunity to understand farmer experiences with OFSP and adoption, retention and dis-adoption patterns. The number of villages per district and households per village was proportional to size. A structured household survey was used for data collection. The questionnaire had several modules including household socio-demographic characteristics; crop production and sales; knowledge, attitudes and practices on sweetpotato; preferred attributes for sweetpotato varieties; growing of OFSP in previous and current seasons; nutrition and vitamin A knowledge; intake of vitamin A rich foods including OFSP, dietary diversity and food security status.

imGoats Mozambique

Small ruminant value chains to reduce poverty and increase food security in India and Mozambique.