Dataset for: Nutritious Orange-Fleshed Sweetpotat (OFSP) For Niassa – Baseline Household Survey

Relevant information on the challenges and opportunities of the project were considered for the benefit of the project results. In fact, most of the findings from the study were used as the baseline reference for evaluating the impact of the project’s intervention in the project target areas three years later, including activities on seed system, crop sales, marketing, nutrition and food security in general.
This baseline survey was conducted between from July 8 to August 23, 2013, and overall, 396 households were visited in 24 villages distributed across the 8 districts surveyed. Overall, about 90% of the farmers interviewed in the present study had agriculture as the most important activity. Among the farmers who mentioned sweetpotato, only about 12% of the households produced OFSP due to earlier dissemination efforts by IIAM and partners. However, only 2.3% of households’ total landholding was under sweetpotato, while 1.3% was plated with OFSP. Although the high number of farmers producing sweetpotatoes, the area under production is relatively small, with an average of 300 m2 per household. In general, sweetpotato was mostly (79%) produced for consumption, while 21% of the interviewees mentioned the sale.
Overall, farmer-to-farmer exchange of planting material was the most important source of sweetpotato planting material. Most farmers obtain sweetpotato planting material from their own plots (69%). However, some considerable farmers depend on vines from neighbors (23%), and about 7% from relatives. There was not any reference related to the selling of planting material. In seed system, vine conservation is one of the critical activities during the sweetpotato production cycle. Vines must be read for planting even after a long dry season. According to the results from this study, most (65%) of sweetpotato is planted 2-3 after the beginning of the raining season. At this moment, vines must be ready for planting. In general, the majority (94%) of sweetpotato farmers usually conserve their vines. The typical methods of conservation include leave some portions of the plot without harvesting (60%) for later sprouting, establish small fenced plots in lowlands (28%), and conservation in small plots near their houses (15%).
Important to note was the fact that most of the selling of the fresh roots was conducted in local marketplaces (64%) as opposed to the farm gate (6%). This means that most of the farmers had to transport their products to local markets and other places in the urban (30%) areas to sell their produce.
Vitamin A knowledge, farmers’ practices, attitude and perception on sweetpotato was further assessed. One of the most important objectives of this project is to address vitamin A deficiency through the consumption of OFSP. Overall, both male (70%) and female (66%) have heard about vitamin A. Although not important, in general, the results indicate that there were slightly more men than women informed about vitamin A among the respondents of this study. The most important source vitamin A information for the women was the health unit (50%), while for the men was the radio (44%) program aired in local language. In general, the use of radio with programs in local languages is more effective for men than women, while, most of the women can be effectively reached by using the heath unit.

Mali Household Surveys for Agricultural Biodiversity Assessment

To identify and quantify the number of all plant and animal species (domesticated and wild) and within each species, the number of types/varieties/breeds at the household-level that are: (a) grown on farm and home garden, or collected from the wild; (b) consumed as part of the diet; and (c) purchased and sold in the study sites. Information was collected for each species on its place of production or collection (farm, home garden, collected in the wild, etc.), the objective for its production or collection (Self-consumption, sale in the market, both), its different uses (food, medicine, animal feed, building material, processing, etc.), seasonality, the number of types, varieties and breeds recognized and used, key characteristics of its seed system (sources of seed, transactions and social relationships), and the water regime associated with its production (rainfed, irrigated, water harvest, etc.). Also data on assets and other socioeconomic indicators were collected.
A household survey was carried out with a representative random sample of 60 households per village in three villages in the region of Sikasso in Mali (part of the Wa, Bobo and Sikasso transect where the CRP Dryland System is working in West Africa). Two of the villages (Fakoro and Kani) were also part of overall baseline survey conducted by ICRISAT. A third village, N’goutjina, was added by Bioversity. The total sample size is 180 households.
The three villages in the Sikasso District of Mali: were: Fakoro (Lat 12°13074, Lon 005°20156); Kani (Lat 12°15011, Lon 005°10827); N’goutjina (Lat 12°17961, Lon 005°28372)

Mali Focus Group Discussions Data: Dataset

A series of focus group discussions (FGDs) to elicit the local knowledge about the agricultural and wild biodiversity present in the study areas in order to generate: (a) an inventory (list) of all useful plant, and animal species used by local communities for human food, animal feed, medicine, fuel, housing, farming tools, etc. and their local names; (b) an inventory of all foods consumed; (c) an inventory of species and products bought and sold in markets that people in the village attend. Two FGDs per village in three villages. FGDs were held separately for men and women in order to collect gender disaggregated data In each of the three villages, two focus group discussions were held separately. One with men and the other with women. Each group will deal with the three aspects for discussion: Useful biological diversity in the production system; Market diversity; and Dietary diversity. There were between 10-16 participants in each group. Each group tried to include a cross-section of individuals involved in agricultural production or at least collecting useful plants from common lands and the wild, representing different levels of access to land (land owners, local land renters and migrant land renters), different ethnic groups present in the village and different age groups (special emphasis should be placed to include younger farmers). For each group there were two facilitators, one to guide the exercise and the other to document the process (take notes, photographs, etc.). The data were elicited using the four-square methodology explained in the Protocol document. The three villages survey were in the Sikasso District of Mali: Fakoro (Lat 12°13074, Lon 005°20156); Kani (Lat 12°15011, Lon 005°10827); N’goutjina (Lat 12°17961, Lon 005°28372)

Mali Focus Group Discussions Data

A series of focus group discussions (FGDs) to elicit the local knowledge about the agricultural and wild biodiversity present in the study areas in order to generate: (a) an inventory (list) of all useful plant, and animal species used by local communities for human food, animal feed, medicine, fuel, housing, farming tools, etc. and their local names; (b) an inventory of all foods consumed; (c) an inventory of species and products bought and sold in markets that people in the village attend. Two FGDs per village in three villages. FGDs were held separately for men and women in order to collect gender disaggregated data
In each of the three villages, two focus group discussions were held separately. One with men and the other with women. Each group will deal with the three aspects for discussion:
Useful biological diversity in the production system; Market diversity; and Dietary diversity. There were between 10-16 participants in each group. Each group tried to include a cross-section of individuals involved in agricultural production or at least collecting useful plants from common lands and the wild, representing different levels of access to land (land owners, local land renters and migrant land renters), different ethnic groups present in the village and different age groups (special emphasis should be placed to include younger farmers). For each group there were two facilitators, one to guide the exercise and the other to document the process (take notes, photographs, etc.). The data were elicited using the four-square methodology explained in the Protocol document.
The three villages survey were in the Sikasso District of Mali: Fakoro (Lat 12°13074, Lon 005°20156); Kani (Lat 12°15011, Lon 005°10827); N’goutjina (Lat 12°17961, Lon 005°28372)

Monitoring of Market Prices, Characterization of Value Chains, Cost and Benefit Analysis, and Adoption Evalutaion

This research aims (1) monitor the market prices on quarterly basis in Bougouni and Koutiala, (2) make a comparative analysis of on-farm trials conducted in intervention zones of the project, (3) value chain analysis of main crops, and (4) make an adoption evaluation of technologies promoted by the project in Bougouni and Koutiala districts.

About the project

Project title: Research Program on Soil & Water Management

Project abstract


As part of the Feed the Future Initiative, the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) is supporting an innovative multi-stakeholder agricultural research program, the Africa Research in Sustainable Intensification for the Next Generation (Africa RISING). The program’s main objective is to identify and validate scalable options for the sustainable intensification of key African cereal-based farming systems to increase food production and improve the livelihoods of smallholder farmers and at the same time conserve or improve the natural resource base.

Project website: http://africa-rising.net

Project start date: 2011-01-01

Project end date : 2016-12-31

Mali Household Surveys for Agricultural Biodiversity Assessment: Dataset

To identify and quantify the number of all plant and animal species (domesticated and wild) and within each species, the number of types/varieties/breeds at the household-level that are: (a) grown on farm and home garden, or collected from the wild; (b) consumed as part of the diet; and (c) purchased and sold in the study sites. Information was collected for each species on its place of production or collection (farm, home garden, collected in the wild, etc.), the objective for its production or collection (Self-consumption, sale in the market, both), its different uses (food, medicine, animal feed, building material, processing, etc.), seasonality, the number of types, varieties and breeds recognized and used, key characteristics of its seed system (sources of seed, transactions and social relationships), and the water regime associated with its production (rainfed, irrigated, water harvest, etc.). Also data on assets and other socioeconomic indicators were collected. A household survey was carried out with a representative random sample of 60 households per village in three villages in the region of Sikasso in Mali (part of the Wa, Bobo and Sikasso transect where the CRP Dryland System is working in West Africa). Two of the villages (Fakoro and Kani) were also part of overall baseline survey conducted by ICRISAT. A third village, N’goutjina, was added by Bioversity. The total sample size is 180 households. The three villages in the Sikasso District of Mali: were: Fakoro (Lat 12°13074, Lon 005°20156); Kani (Lat 12°15011, Lon 005°10827); N’goutjina (Lat 12°17961, Lon 005°28372)

Protocol for the Agricultural Biodiversity (ABD) Assessment in Mali / Protocole pour l’évaluation de la Biodiversité Agricole (ABD) á Mali

The biodiversity of plant and animal species both domesticated and wild used for food by humans (referred to here as agricultural biodiversity—ABD) is one of the most important assets for rural households, particularly for the poor in marginal areas such as the drylands of the developing world. A contribution of Bioversity International to the Dryland Systems CGIAR Research Programme (CRP) [http://drylandsystems.cgiar.org/] has been to examine systematically the diversity of these species in CRP target sites in Mali, Ghana, Malawi and India. Bioversity and partners have carried out a set of Agricultural Biodiversity Assessments in these countries. In the case of Mali, the selected sites include two villages in the Sikasso region: Kani and Farakoro. These villages have been already part of an ICRISAT baseline survey. An additional village, N’Goutjina, was selected by Bioversity to complement the work. Here we present the protocols used for collecting the data from Mali.
The objective of the ABD Assessment is to identify and quantify all the useful plant, animal, and aquatic species utilized by rural households and communities in the Dryland Systems CRP sites, as well as information on markets attended and general socioeconomic household characteristics. This information will be used to characterize three dimensions of ABD: (1) diversity in the production system, including on farm and common lands; (2) dietary diversity; and (3) market diversity; in terms of the elements and relationships involved and the exogenous factors that influence their status and dynamics. These data will be the basis for analyzing the roles of ABD in the lives and livelihoods of these rural populations in order to identify entry points for designing and implementing interventions that contribute to improve their well-being.

Evaluating Fertilizer Recommendations with Farmers

The Africa RISING program adopts the mother-baby trial approach to test, validate and disseminate research results. Under this approach farmers have been exposed to the technologies tested and validated on-farm (mother trials). Thereafter, farmers are given the opportunity to experiment technology they chose on their farms (baby trials) after a training. In this context, ICRAF and partners developed fertilizer recommendations (30 kg P/ha and 60 kg N/ha) for maize in semi-arid Tanzania during the 2013 and 2014 growing seasons. Farmers were involved to test these rates widely in their fields (as baby plots) when integrated with improve maize varieties and different types of fertilizers. Fertilizer tested were Minjingu and Yara Mila Cereals fertilizers and maize varieties were Staha, Kilima, SEED Co and a local variety known as Gunzi Jekundu. The work started with training farmers on promising fertilizer technologies and good agronomic practices (GAP) during the beginning of the 2015 (293 farmers) and 2016 seasons (682 farmers). About 605 farmers (55% Male and 45% Female) who attended training in 2016 established baby trials to validate fertilizer-maize variety technologies. Each baby farmers had a max of four plots assessing performance of improved maize variety and local variety with and without Minjingu (Nafaka Plus for basal application at planting and Minjingu top dressing) or Yara Mila Cereal fertilizers. Yara Mila Cereal was used for a basal and top dressing applications as per guideline printed in the fertilizer bag and from the company’s agronomist.This data study contains data produced from these trials.

About the project

Project title: Intensification of Maize-Legume Based Systems in the Semi-Arid Areas of Tanzania to Increase Farm Productivity and Improve Farming Natural Resource Base

Project abstract


The aim of the Africa RISING project in Kongwa and Kiteto Districts, Tanzania is to provide a scientific basis for sustainably intensifying agricultural production in semi-arid areas of central Tanzania. The project activities are falls under 4 thematic areas that address three critical elements of sustainable intensification (SI), i.e. genetic, ecological and socio-economic intensification technologies. The scope of activities being implemented include: packaging of new legume and cereal varieties with over 120% yield advantage, packaging and validation of integrated productivity enhancing technologies for cereals, legumes, legume trees and soil health technologies, food safety primarily to reduce aflatoxin contamination and integration of livestock into the cropping systems. The innovation platform is used to set R4D priority in the action sites. The project team is comprised of national partners (e.g. ARI-Hombolo, District Agricultural Officers, SUA and UDOM) and CG Partners (CIMMYT and ICRAF) under the leadership of ICRISAT.

Project website: http://africa-rising.net/where-we-work/west-africa/

Project start date: 2012-05-01

Project end date : 2016-09-30

Scaling-Up Sustainable Cropping Practices: ‘Zia’ and ‘Micro-dosing’

This data study explores raising and sustaining productivity in cereal-legume cropping systems in northern Ghana.

About the project

Project title: AfricaRISING – Sustainable Intensification of Cereal-Based Farming Systems in the Guinea-Sudan-Savanna of Ghana and Mali

Project abstract


In Ghana, Zia has been successfully been introduced on a limited scale to farmers in the East Gonja, East Mamprusi districts in the Northern region and Guru and Builsa district in Upper East region Presbyterian Agricultural Services. However, Zia farming is an innovative technology which involves the burial of manure/organic matter in holes/ pits and planting the crop later on top of the pit. The objectives of this study are to evaluate and disseminate the Zia and fertilizer Micro-dosing techniques on-farm; to undertake cost benefit analysis of the Zia and fertilizer Micro-dosing; to explore the potential increase in grain yield of Zia and fertilizer Micro-dosing over farmers practice in the Africa RISING intervention communities; to undertake comparative analysis of the effect of Zia and fertilizer Micro-dosing on maize,sorghum, and millet.

Project website: http://africa-rising.net/where-we-work/west-africa/

Project start date: 01/06/2014

Project end date : 01/09/2014

Maize and Pigeonpea Intercropping

The project tested different spatial maize/pigeon peas arrangements in the field with already recommended varieties that are differentiated by maturity periods (which affect canopy interactions). The maize varieties included PAN 691, a long maturing maize variety, Mkombozi, an early to medium maturity high yielding maize variety, and SC 627, an early maturing variety. These were intercropped with pigeon peas variety Mali from ICRISAT, a long maturing and high yielding variety that was considered new in the study sites.


About the project

Project title: Research in Sustainable Intensification in the Sub-Humid Maize-Based Cropping Systems of Babati

Project abstract

Promoting sustainable intensification through efficient application of a local source of phosphorus (Minjingu PR).

Project website:http://africa-rising.net