Crop improvement, adoption and impact of improved bean varieties in Sub Saharan Africa

The crop improvement research effort of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) centers and their national agricultural research systems (NARS) partners has had a large impact on world food production. Although bean impact has been documented in a number of past studies, the last comprehensive study of the international crop improvement effort, organized by the Standing Panel for Impact Assessment (SPIA, formerly the Impact Assessment and Evaluation Group), was based on data collected a decade ago (Evenson and Gollin, 2003 based on 1997-98 data). Important changes have occurred in the funding and conduct of the international crop improvement effort and in the general climate for agriculture in the developing world since the completion of the Evenson and Gollin study.
The level and focus of funding for research in the NARS and in the CGIAR centers have fluctuated greatly, and the role of the private sector has evolved. Yet, the importance of the CGIAR/NARS crop improvement effort in feeding the world is arguably as important today as it has been at any time in history. The steady uptake and turnover of crop varieties is fundamental to realizing a Green Revolution in Africa, and it is still important for helping achieve income growth for numerous poor rural households. But our present understanding of improved variety adoption—by crop, by location, by adopter and by source—is limited in Africa.
The data seeks to redress this anomaly, by providing a versatile database on bean variety adoption by crop, by location, by adopter and by source in sub-saharan countries. The following countries are covered: Burundi, DRCongo, Ethiopia, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia.

Crop improvement, adoption and impact of improved bean varieties in Sub Saharan Africa

The crop improvement research effort of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) centers and their national agricultural research systems (NARS) partners has had a large impact on world food production. Although bean impact has been documented in a number of past studies, the last comprehensive study of the international crop improvement effort, organized by the Standing Panel for Impact Assessment (SPIA, formerly the Impact Assessment and Evaluation Group), was based on data collected a decade ago (Evenson and Gollin, 2003 based on 1997-98 data). Important changes have occurred in the funding and conduct of the international crop improvement effort and in the general climate for agriculture in the developing world since the completion of the Evenson and Gollin study.
The level and focus of funding for research in the NARS and in the CGIAR centers have fluctuated greatly, and the role of the private sector has evolved. Yet, the importance of the CGIAR/NARS crop improvement effort in feeding the world is arguably as important today as it has been at any time in history. The steady uptake and turnover of crop varieties is fundamental to realizing a Green Revolution in Africa, and it is still important for helping achieve income growth for numerous poor rural households. But our present understanding of improved variety adoption—by crop, by location, by adopter and by source—is limited in Africa.
The data seeks to redress this anomaly, by providing a versatile database on bean variety adoption by crop, by location, by adopter and by source in sub-saharan countries. The following countries are covered: Burundi, DRCongo, Ethiopia, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia.

Protocol for the Agricultural Biodiversity (ABD) Assessment in Mali / Protocole pour l’évaluation de la Biodiversité Agricole (ABD) á Mali

The biodiversity of plant and animal species both domesticated and wild used for food by humans (referred to here as agricultural biodiversity—ABD) is one of the most important assets for rural households, particularly for the poor in marginal areas such as the drylands of the developing world. A contribution of Bioversity International to the Dryland Systems CGIAR Research Programme (CRP) [http://drylandsystems.cgiar.org/] has been to examine systematically the diversity of these species in CRP target sites in Mali, Ghana, Malawi and India. Bioversity and partners have carried out a set of Agricultural Biodiversity Assessments in these countries. In the case of Mali, the selected sites include two villages in the Sikasso region: Kani and Farakoro. These villages have been already part of an ICRISAT baseline survey. An additional village, N’Goutjina, was selected by Bioversity to complement the work. Here we present the protocols used for collecting the data from Mali.
The objective of the ABD Assessment is to identify and quantify all the useful plant, animal, and aquatic species utilized by rural households and communities in the Dryland Systems CRP sites, as well as information on markets attended and general socioeconomic household characteristics. This information will be used to characterize three dimensions of ABD: (1) diversity in the production system, including on farm and common lands; (2) dietary diversity; and (3) market diversity; in terms of the elements and relationships involved and the exogenous factors that influence their status and dynamics. These data will be the basis for analyzing the roles of ABD in the lives and livelihoods of these rural populations in order to identify entry points for designing and implementing interventions that contribute to improve their well-being.

Assessment of Informal Cross Border Fish Trade in the Southern African Region: A case of Zambia and Malawi

Intra-regional fish trade has potential in addressing the region’s food and nutrition insecurity, as well as poverty reduction, by enabling movement of fish from countries of surplus to those with deficit. However, informal fish trade, just like all informal economic activities, has been overlooked and neglected in many national and regional policies, leading to obscurity of such an important part of the fisheries sector. This study examined the situation in the cross-border informal fish trade to deepen our understanding about the traders, the factors influencing the traders to use informal trade channels, the structure of the products traded and the challenges traders face, as well as propose policy direction to enhance the cross-border fish trade in the Southern Africa region. The study revealed that female traders dominated informal fish trade. In both Malawi and Zambia, an estimated 45,285.52 metric tonnes of fish valued at 82.14 million dollars and 102,263.9 metric tonnes of fish valued at 3.3 million dollars were informally traded. The key species involved in informal cross-border trade in Malawi and Zambia were the small pelagics, usipa (Engraulicypris sardella) from Lake Malawi and dagaa (Rastrineobola argentea) from Lake Tanganyika, respectively. It emerged from focus group discussions with informal fish traders and key informants’ interviews with border post fish inspection and revenue collection officials that traders are put off by the cross-border regulations. Therefore, it is important for countries in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region to regularize and formalize cross-border trade, particularly in small pelagic fish species, since this species plays a great role in the livelihoods, food and nutrition security of many people in the region, especially the rural and urban poor. It is also important for governments to support processors and traders to improve the quality of fish being traded, and decentralize issuing of the import/export certificates and other cross-border support documents. Lastly, there is a need to establish informal fish trade monitoring systems to adequately quantify the volumes traded.

Malawi Household Surveys for Agricultural Biodiversity Assessment

To identify and quantify all the useful plant, animal, and aquatic species utilized by rural households and communities in the Dryland Systems CRP sites, as well as information on markets attended and general socioeconomic household characteristics. Within each species, the number of types/varieties/breeds at the household-level that are: (a) grown on farm and home garden, or collected from the wild; (b) consumed as part of the diet; and (c) purchased and sold in the study sites. Information was collected for each species on its place of production or collection (farm, home garden, collected in the wild, etc.), the objective for its production or collection (Self-consumption, sale in the market, both), its different uses (food, medicine, animal feed, building material, processing, etc.), seasonality, the number of types, varieties and breeds recognized and used, key characteristics of its seed system (sources of seed, transactions and social relationships), and the water regime associated with its production (rainfed, irrigated, water harvest, etc.). Socioeconomic data collected were: family size, land owned and cultivated, water resources, housing, ownership of consumer goods, sources of income, social networking etc. This information will be used to characterize three dimensions of ABD: (1) diversity in the production system, including on farm and common lands; (2) dietary diversity; and (3) market diversity; in terms of the elements and relationships involved and the exogenous factors that influence their status and dynamics. These data will be the basis for analyzing the roles of ABD (Agricultural Biodiversity) in the lives and livelihoods of these rural populations in order to identify entry points for designing and implementing interventions that contribute to improve their well-being.
A household survey with a representative random sample of 50 households per village for the sections/villages sampled for overall baseline survey in the Ntcheu District of Malawi. Data was collected from from sections/villages selcted from extension areas (EPAs). The total sample size is 340 households.
Four extenstion planning areas in the Ntcheu District of Malawi were surveyed: Manjawira, Nsipe, Sharpevale and Tsangano

Malawi Household Surveys for Agricultural Biodiversity Assessment: Dataset

To identify and quantify all the useful plant, animal, and aquatic species utilized by rural households and communities in the Dryland Systems CRP sites, as well as information on markets attended and general socioeconomic household characteristics. Within each species, the number of types/varieties/breeds at the household-level that are: (a) grown on farm and home garden, or collected from the wild; (b) consumed as part of the diet; and (c) purchased and sold in the study sites. Information was collected for each species on its place of production or collection (farm, home garden, collected in the wild, etc.), the objective for its production or collection (Self-consumption, sale in the market, both), its different uses (food, medicine, animal feed, building material, processing, etc.), seasonality, the number of types, varieties and breeds recognized and used, key characteristics of its seed system (sources of seed, transactions and social relationships), and the water regime associated with its production (rainfed, irrigated, water harvest, etc.). Socioeconomic data collected were: family size, land owned and cultivated, water resources, housing, ownership of consumer goods, sources of income, social networking etc. This information will be used to characterize three dimensions of ABD: (1) diversity in the production system, including on farm and common lands; (2) dietary diversity; and (3) market diversity; in terms of the elements and relationships involved and the exogenous factors that influence their status and dynamics. These data will be the basis for analyzing the roles of ABD (Agricultural Biodiversity) in the lives and livelihoods of these rural populations in order to identify entry points for designing and implementing interventions that contribute to improve their well-being. A household survey with a representative random sample of 50 households per village for the sections/villages sampled for overall baseline survey in the Ntcheu District of Malawi. Data was collected from from sections/villages selcted from extension areas (EPAs). The total sample size is 340 households. Four extenstion planning areas in the Ntcheu District of Malawi were surveyed: Manjawira, Nsipe, Sharpevale and Tsangano

Dataset for: RTC-Action Malawi Project Baseline study for Potato Component

The baseline study was conducted to assess and understand the socio-economic situation of farmers including potato production methods and technologies, seed system, input and output market systems, farmer capacity levels, perception on potato nutrition issues and food security situation. The results show that potato production is mainly dominated by female headed households in the new districts (Dowa and Mzimba) mainly because the crop is relatively newer but slowly getting popularity due to the declining tobacco performance that has been the number one cash crop in these districts. The average age of the sampled household heads was 34 in all the districts and this result indicates that the potato production is mainly dominated by people who are still in the productive age. This observation is consistent with the fact that potato production is relatively labour intensive hence it requires participation of active adults and the youth. Further to this, the results show that on average the households have a total land size of 1.5 acres (0.6 ha) which is consistent with the results of the recent IHS 4 that also reported that on average in Malawi, the average cultivated area is about 1.5 acres and further results also show that on average, male-headed households cultivated 1.7 acres compared to their female counterparts who cultivated 1.2 acres.

Malawi Complementary Panel Survey (CPS) 2000-2002

The Complementary Panel Survey (CPS) is a continuation of the work undertaken by the Malawi Poverty Monitoring System (PMS) since 1997. Four rounds of the CPS were conducted between January 2000 and September 2002. The PMS itself was conceived as part of the Government of Malawi’s Poverty Alleviation Programme (PAP) launched in 1994. The Policy Framework for PAP articulated the overall objective of the PMS as being to assist the government monitor poverty by collecting and analyzing data rel
evant to track progress in poverty reduction and to help guide the formulation of poverty alleviation policies and programs.



The Malawi National Statistical Office, the National Economic Council (NEC) and the Center for Social Research of the University of Malawi along with the technical assistance of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), a program encompassing the implementation of a regular detailed Integrated Household Survey (IHS) was designed. The resulting Complementary Panel Survey is based on the IHS sample and complementary to the IHS, and the poverty analysis of the data collec
ted by the two survey programs. The IHS was to be conducted every three to five years, while the panel survey twice a year. The final sample size of the CPS in the first round was 758 households.



The CPS dataset includes information on education; morbidity; food security and coping strategies; labour and employment; income, expenditures, and transfers. The questionnaire for the fourth round of the CPS was developed explicitly to allow a welfare indicator to be constructed that would be comparable to the welfare indicator developed in the poverty analysis of the 1997-98 Integrated Household Survey. This was necessary to allow the IHS data and poverty analysis to be linked to th
e CPS data in order to undertake an analysis of the dynamics of household welfare in the CPS sample between the IHS and the fourth round.

Malawi Focus Group Discussions Data: Dataset

A series of focus group discussions (FGDs) to elicit the local knowledge about the agricultural and wild biodiversity present in the study areas in order to generate: (a) an inventory (list) of all useful plant, animal, insect and aquatic species used by local communities for human food, animal feed, medicine, fuel, housing, farming tools, etc. and their local names; (b) an inventory of all foods consumed; (c) an inventory of species and products bought and sold in markets that people in the village attend. All the FGDs were held separately for men and women in order to collect gender disaggregated data. Focus group discussions carried out in the selected EPAs/sections. Information was collected on the useful species grown/collected/managed in the target sections/villages. For common and well-known species, the name and a photo of each species were recorded in the list of useful plants in the target communities. There groups were split into two: one of males and one of females. Each group dealt with the four aspects for discussion: (a) Useful biological diversity in the production system (b) Dietary diversity (c)Market diversity. Four extension planning areas in the Ntcheu District of Malawi were surveyed: Manjawira, Nsipe, Sharpevale and Tsangano

Malawi Focus Group Discussions Data

A series of focus group discussions (FGDs) to elicit the local knowledge about the agricultural and wild biodiversity present in the study areas in order to generate: (a) an inventory (list) of all useful plant, animal, insect and aquatic species used by local communities for human food, animal feed, medicine, fuel, housing, farming tools, etc. and their local names; (b) an inventory of all foods consumed; (c) an inventory of species and products bought and sold in markets that people in the village attend. All the FGDs were held separately for men and women in order to collect gender disaggregated data.
Focus group discussions carried out in the selected EPAs/sections. Information was collected on the useful species grown/collected/managed in the target sections/villages. For common and well-known species, the name and a photo of each species were recorded in the list of useful plants in the target communities.
There groups were split into two: one of males and one of females. Each group dealt with the four aspects for discussion: (a) Useful biological diversity in the production system (b) Dietary diversity (c)Market diversity. Four extension planning areas in the Ntcheu District of Malawi were surveyed: Manjawira, Nsipe, Sharpevale and Tsangano