Ghana Focus Group Discussions Data

A series of focus group discussions (FGDs) to elicit the local knowledge about the agricultural and wild biodiversity present in the study areas in order to generate: (a) an inventory (list) of all useful plant, and animal species used by local communities for human food, animal feed, medicine, fuel, housing, farming tools, etc. and their local names; (b) an inventory of all foods consumed; (c) an inventory of species and products bought and sold in markets that people in the village attend. Two FGDs per village in three villages. FGDs were held separately for men and women in order to collect gender disaggregated data.
Geographic area includes: Three villages in the Lawra District of Ghana: Bonpari (Lat 10.67, Lon W002.81); Gbelinkaa (Lat N10.58, Lon W002.83); Yagtuur (Lat N10.55, Lon W 002.86)
In each of the three villages, two focus group discussions were held separately. One with men and the other with women. Each group will deal with the three aspects for discussion:
Useful biological diversity in the production system; Market diversity; and Dietary diversity. There were between 10-16 participants in each group. Each group tried to include a cross-section of individuals involved in agricultural production or at least collecting useful plants from common lands and the wild, representing different levels of access to land (land owners, local land renters and migrant land renters), different ethnic groups present in the village and different age groups (special emphasis should be placed to include younger farmers). For each group there were two facilitators, one to guide the exercise and the other to document the process (take notes, photographs, etc.). The data were elicited using the four-square methodology explained in the Protocol document.

Ghana Focus Group Discussions Data: Dataset

A series of focus group discussions (FGDs) to elicit the local knowledge about the agricultural and wild biodiversity present in the study areas in order to generate: (a) an inventory (list) of all useful plant, and animal species used by local communities for human food, animal feed, medicine, fuel, housing, farming tools, etc. and their local names; (b) an inventory of all foods consumed; (c) an inventory of species and products bought and sold in markets that people in the village attend. Two FGDs per village in three villages. FGDs were held separately for men and women in order to collect gender disaggregated data. Geographic area includes: Three villages in the Lawra District of Ghana: Bonpari (Lat 10.67, Lon W002.81); Gbelinkaa (Lat N10.58, Lon W002.83); Yagtuur (Lat N10.55, Lon W 002.86) In each of the three villages, two focus group discussions were held separately. One with men and the other with women. Each group will deal with the three aspects for discussion: Useful biological diversity in the production system; Market diversity; and Dietary diversity. There were between 10-16 participants in each group. Each group tried to include a cross-section of individuals involved in agricultural production or at least collecting useful plants from common lands and the wild, representing different levels of access to land (land owners, local land renters and migrant land renters), different ethnic groups present in the village and different age groups (special emphasis should be placed to include younger farmers). For each group there were two facilitators, one to guide the exercise and the other to document the process (take notes, photographs, etc.). The data were elicited using the four-square methodology explained in the Protocol document

Protocol for the Agricultural Biodiversity (ABD) Assessment in Mali / Protocole pour l’évaluation de la Biodiversité Agricole (ABD) á Mali

The biodiversity of plant and animal species both domesticated and wild used for food by humans (referred to here as agricultural biodiversity—ABD) is one of the most important assets for rural households, particularly for the poor in marginal areas such as the drylands of the developing world. A contribution of Bioversity International to the Dryland Systems CGIAR Research Programme (CRP) [http://drylandsystems.cgiar.org/] has been to examine systematically the diversity of these species in CRP target sites in Mali, Ghana, Malawi and India. Bioversity and partners have carried out a set of Agricultural Biodiversity Assessments in these countries. In the case of Mali, the selected sites include two villages in the Sikasso region: Kani and Farakoro. These villages have been already part of an ICRISAT baseline survey. An additional village, N’Goutjina, was selected by Bioversity to complement the work. Here we present the protocols used for collecting the data from Mali.
The objective of the ABD Assessment is to identify and quantify all the useful plant, animal, and aquatic species utilized by rural households and communities in the Dryland Systems CRP sites, as well as information on markets attended and general socioeconomic household characteristics. This information will be used to characterize three dimensions of ABD: (1) diversity in the production system, including on farm and common lands; (2) dietary diversity; and (3) market diversity; in terms of the elements and relationships involved and the exogenous factors that influence their status and dynamics. These data will be the basis for analyzing the roles of ABD in the lives and livelihoods of these rural populations in order to identify entry points for designing and implementing interventions that contribute to improve their well-being.

Impact of sustainable intensification technologies on on-farm agricultural diversity in Africa RISING communities of Ghana

The project aimed at testing the hypothesis that the application of sustainable intensification technologies (cereal-legume-vegetable-livestock integrated systems) by smallholder households in North Ghana changes the level of inter and intra-specific crop diversity managed on-farm at household level. The project included two main activities: (1) analyses of the baseline socioeconomic survey data gathered by IFPRI and IITA from a diversity perspective; and (2) implementation and analysis of a series of focus group discussions in 12 communities to assess the overall diversity of plant species that households manage and derive benefits from.

Study title: Focus Group Discussions-Agrobiodiversity Assessment

Study description: A series of FGDs in 12 communities were carried out during the earlier part of 2016. The objective of FGDs on agricultural biodiversity was to elicit the local knowledge about the agricultural and useful wild biodiversity present in the study areas in order to generate: (a) an ordered inventory (list) of all useful plants used by local communities for human food, animal feed, medicine, fuel, etc. and their local names; and (b) an inventory of species and other products bought and sold in markets that people attend. The aim was to have a subjective assessment of the overall diversity of species households manage and derive benefits from, how important each species is and how it contributes to the household’s food and income, as well as how it is used.

Project website: http://africa-rising.net

Project start date: 07/01/2015

Project end date : 06/30/2016

Improved Crop Varieties, Agronomic Practices, Soil Water Conservation Practices

Establishment of demonstration plots on improved crop varieties (maize, groundnuts, soybeans and beans) and best-bet agronomic pratices and soil and water conservation practices in Babati, Kongwa, kiteto, Mvomero, Mbozi, Kilosa and Kilolo in Tanzania. Training of lead farmers and extension staff to empower them with knowledge on improved technologies so that they can also train others.

This study contains data from different cereal legume rotation systems in northern Ghana.

About the project

Project title: Enhancing Partnership among Africa RISING (AR), NAFAKA and TUBORESHE CHAKULA (TUBOCHA) Programs for Fast-Tracking Delivery and Scaling of Agricultural Technologies in Tanzania

Project abstract


This project is implemented in partnership between Africa RISING research team and NAFAKA and focuses on scaling of agricultural technologies that include deployment of improved maize varieties and legumes (beans, soybean, groundnuts), deployment of improved water and soil conservation practices and improved good agricultural practices in Babati, Kongwa, Kiteto, Kilosa, Mvomero, Mbozi and Kilolo districts of Tanzania. The project is implemented by CIMMYT, IITA, CIAT, ICRAF, ARI-Hombolo, AMINATA Quality Seeds compnay, Meru Agro-Tours and Cosultants seed company, NAFAKA and Selian Agricultural Research Institute.

Project website: http://africa-rising.net

Project start date: 01/01/2014

Project end date : 09/30/2017

Scaling-Up Sustainable Cropping Practices: ‘Zia’ and ‘Micro-dosing’

This data study explores raising and sustaining productivity in cereal-legume cropping systems in northern Ghana.

About the project

Project title: AfricaRISING – Sustainable Intensification of Cereal-Based Farming Systems in the Guinea-Sudan-Savanna of Ghana and Mali

Project abstract


In Ghana, Zia has been successfully been introduced on a limited scale to farmers in the East Gonja, East Mamprusi districts in the Northern region and Guru and Builsa district in Upper East region Presbyterian Agricultural Services. However, Zia farming is an innovative technology which involves the burial of manure/organic matter in holes/ pits and planting the crop later on top of the pit. The objectives of this study are to evaluate and disseminate the Zia and fertilizer Micro-dosing techniques on-farm; to undertake cost benefit analysis of the Zia and fertilizer Micro-dosing; to explore the potential increase in grain yield of Zia and fertilizer Micro-dosing over farmers practice in the Africa RISING intervention communities; to undertake comparative analysis of the effect of Zia and fertilizer Micro-dosing on maize,sorghum, and millet.

Project website: http://africa-rising.net/where-we-work/west-africa/

Project start date: 01/06/2014

Project end date : 01/09/2014

Replication Data for: Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Different Land-Use Systems: A Case Study of CO2 in the Southern Zone of Ghana

The emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) results in global warming and climate change. +e extent to which developing countries contribute to GHG emissions is not well known. +is study reports findings on the effects of different land-use systems on GHG emissions (CO2 in this case) from two locations in the southern zone of Ghana, West Africa. Site one (located at Kpong) contained a heavy clay soil while site two (located at Legon) contained a light-textured sandy soil. Land-use systems include cattle kraals, natural forests, cultivated maize fields, and rice paddy fields at site one, and natural forest, woodlots, and cultivated soya bean fields at site two. CO2 emissions were measured using the gas entrapment method (PVC chambers). Trapping solutions were changed every 12–48 h and measurement lasted 9 to 15 days depending on the site. We found that, for the same land-use, CO2 emissions were higher on the clay soil (Kpong) than the sandy soil (Legon). In the clay soil environment, the highest average CO2 emission was observed from the cattle kraal (256.7 mg·m−2 ·h−1 ), followed by the forest (146.0 mg·m−2 ·h−1 ) and rice paddy (140.6 mg·m−2 ·h−1 ) field. +e lowest average emission was observed for maize cropped land (112.0 mg·m−2 ·h−1 ). In the sandy soil environment, the highest average CO2 emission was observed from soya cropped land (52.5 mg·m−2 ·h−1 ), followed by the forest (47.4 mg·m−2 ·h−1 ) and woodlot (33.7 mg·m−2 ·h−1 ). Several factors influenced CO2 emissions from the different land-use systems. +ese include the inherent properties of the soils such as texture, temperature, and moisture content, which influenced CO2 production through their effect on soil microbial activity and root respiration. Practices that reduce CO2 emissions are likely to promote carbon sequestration, which will consequently maintain or increase crop productivity and thereby improve global or regional food security

Focus Group Discussions-Agrobiodiversity Assessment

The project aimed at testing the hypothesis that the application of sustainable intensification technologies (cereal-legume-vegetable-livestock integrated systems) by smallholder households in North Ghana changes the level of inter and intra-specific crop diversity managed on-farm at household level. The project included two main activities: (1) analyses of the baseline socioeconomic survey data gathered by IFPRI and IITA from a diversity perspective; and (2) implementation and analysis of a series of focus group discussions in 12 communities to assess the overall diversity of plant species that households manage and derive benefits from.

Study title: Focus Group Discussions-Agrobiodiversity Assessment

Study description: A series of FGDs in 12 communities were carried out during the earlier part of 2016. The objective of FGDs on agricultural biodiversity was to elicit the local knowledge about the agricultural and useful wild biodiversity present in the study areas in order to generate: (a) an ordered inventory (list) of all useful plants used by local communities for human food, animal feed, medicine, fuel, etc. and their local names; and (b) an inventory of species and other products bought and sold in markets that people attend. The aim was to have a subjective assessment of the overall diversity of species households manage and derive benefits from, how important each species is and how it contributes to the household’s food and income, as well as how it is used.

Project website: http://africa-rising.net

Project start date: 07/01/2015

Project end date : 06/30/2016

Test and Disseminate Technologies to Intensity Vegetable Mono-cropping

This data study explores integrating vegetable into cereal-legume cropping productions systems in Ghana

About the project

Project title:
AfricaRISING – Sustainable Intensification of Cereal-based Farming Systems in the Guinea-Sudan-Savanna of Ghana and Mali

Project abstract

Four vegetable crops will be compared across subsets of 30-50 households in each of the 3 northern regions using two planting densities and they are Amaranth for Upper West Region, Jute Mallow for the Northern region and Roselle for the Upper East region. Three fruit vegetables (Okra in all the regions), African eggplant and tomato in the other two regions and one spice vegetable (Pepper), in all the three regions.

Project website:
http://africa-rising.net

Project start date: 01/06/2014

Project end date : 01/11/2014

Testing and Dissemination of Improve Varieties and Agronomic Practices Using the ‘Mother-Baby’ Approach

This study explores raising and sustaining productivity in cereal-legume cropping systems in northern Ghana

About the project

Project title: AfricaRISING – Sustainable Intensification of Cereal-Based Farming Systems in the Guinea-Sudan-Savanna of Ghana and Mali

Project abstract

In 2013, four mother-baby trials started to test and demonstrate crop variety and combinations of variety and agronomic options will continue for the second year. A split-plot design replicated in 4-6 communities per region will be used in the trials with 30 babies per community for each mother trial.

Project website: https://africa-rising.net/

Project start date: 01/06/2014

Project end date : 01/09/2014