Ethiopia Alive & Thrive Baseline Survey 2010: Community

This dataset is the result of the community survey that was conducted to gather data at baseline as a part of the impact evaluation of the Alive & Thrive (A&T) interventions in Ethiopia. The broad objective of the impact evaluation in Ethiopia is to measure the impact of A&T’s community-based interventions, delivered through the government’s health extension program (HEP) platform, in the reduction of stunting and improvement of IYCF practices in two regions where the IFHP operates, namely Tigray and SNNPR (Southern Nations, Nationalities, and People’s Region).

A&T is a six-year initiative to facilitate change for improved infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices at scale in Bangladesh, Ethiopia, and Viet Nam. The goal of A&T is to reduce avoidable death and disability due to suboptimal IYCF in the developing world by increasing exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) until 6 months of age and reducing stunting of children 0-24 months of age.


The Ethiopia baseline survey had two broad objectives. The first objective was to gather data on the primary impact indicators of the evaluation, prior to implementation of any A&T interventions, to establish a baseline against which changes would be measured. The second objective was to assess different factors that may influence the outcomes of interest, and thus shape the impact of the primary impact indicators. These factors were determined at five different levels: 1) child, 2) maternal/caregiver, 3) household, 4) community, 5) health care providers, 6) health system. These factors will also provide useful information to interpret the results of the impact evaluation and also signal key issues to pay attention to in the process evaluation.



The Ethiopia baseline survey used five separate questionnaires that aimed to capture elements along the program impact pathways. These tools include 1) a household questionnaire, 2) a staff questionnaire of HEWs, 3) a staff questionnaire of supervisors of HEWs, 4) a VCHP), and 5) a community questionnaire.


The community questionnaire provided information on the following: 1) general characteristics of the cluster: population, number of households’ languages, livelihood, season of food shortage, topography; 2) infrastructure: access to main road (both during dry and rainy season), electricity, access to clean water; 3) distance from the nearest major town, type of transportation used to reach this town; 4) access to the nearest market; 5) migration pattern; 6) social and food assistance, such as presence of productive safety net program, community-based nutrition program, etc.; 7) natural disaster occurring in the area during the three years before the survey; 8) availability and access to health services: health post, government hospital, private clinic, etc.; 9) availability of education facility: junior and high school, college.

The community questionnaire was administered to a group of community members to gather information on the contextual factors related to each community as well as to understand differences in community characteristics across the clusters (enumeration areas (EA)). This information at the community level is critical to control for externalities that could influence the outcome of the program.

Ethiopia Alive & Thrive Baseline Survey 2010: Households

This dataset is the result of the household survey that was conducted to gather data at baseline as a part of the impact evaluation of the Alive & Thrive (A&T) interventions in Ethiopia. The broad objective of the impact evaluation in Ethiopia is to measure the impact of A&T’s community-based interventions, delivered through the government’s health extension program (HEP) platform, in the reduction of stunting and improvement of IYCF practices in two regions where the IFHP operates, namely Tigray and SNNPR (Southern Nations, Nationalities, and People’s Region).


A&T is a six-year initiative to facilitate change for improved infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices at scale in Bangladesh, Ethiopia, and Viet Nam. The goal of A&T is to reduce avoidable death and disability due to suboptimal IYCF in the developing world by increasing exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) until 6 months of age and reducing stunting of children 0-24 months of age.


The Ethiopia baseline survey had two broad objectives. The first objective was to gather data on the primary impact indicators of the evaluation, prior to implementation of any A&T interventions, to establish a baseline against which changes would be measured. The second objective was to assess different factors that may influence the outcomes of interest, and thus shape the impact of the primary impact indicators. These factors were determined at five different levels: 1) child, 2) maternal/caregiver, 3) household, 4) community, 5) health care providers, 6) health system. These factors will also provide useful information to interpret the results of the impact evaluation and also signal key issues to pay attention to in the process evaluation.


The Ethiopia baseline survey used five separate questionnaires that aimed to capture elements along the program impact pathways. These tools include 1) a household questionnaire, 2) a staff questionnaire of HEWs, 3) a staff questionnaire of supervisors of HEWs, 4) a VCHP), and 5) a community questionnaire.


The household questionnaire in Ethiopia consisted of 14 different modules covering a wide range of information both for assessing the outcomes of interests as well as factors that influence the uptake and adoption of A&T interventions, such as household food security, socioeconomic status, parental characteristics, maternal knowledge and skills about IYCF, exposure to A&T and other IYCF/nutrition interventions, exposure to media, household gender relationships, and child characteristics, e.g., age, gender, perceptions about size and birth. The questions are largely based on previously validated questions or modules.

Ethiopia Alive & Thrive Baseline Survey 2010: Health Extension Workers

This dataset is the result of the health extension workers (HEW) survey that was conducted to gather data at baseline as a part of the impact evaluation of the Alive & Thrive (A&T) interventions in Ethiopia. The broad objective of the impact evaluation in Ethiopia is to measure the impact of A&T’s community-based interventions, delivered through the government’s health extension program (HEP) platform, in the reduction of stunting and improvement of IYCF practices in two regions where the IFHP operates, namely Tigray and SNNPR (Southern Nations, Nationalities, and People’s Region).


A&T is a six-year initiative to facilitate change for improved infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices at scale in Bangladesh, Ethiopia, and Viet Nam. The goal of A&T is to reduce avoidable death and disability due to suboptimal IYCF in the developing world by increasing exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) until 6 months of age and reducing stunting of children 0-24 months of age.


The Ethiopia baseline survey had two broad objectives. The first objective was to gather data on the primary impact indicators of the evaluation, prior to implementation of any A&T interventions, to establish a baseline against which changes would be measured. The second objective was to assess different factors that may influence the outcomes of interest, and thus shape the impact of the primary impact indicators. These factors were determined at five different levels: 1) child, 2) maternal/caregiver, 3) household, 4) community, 5) health care providers, 6) health system. These factors will also provide useful information to interpret the results of the impact evaluation and also signal key issues to pay attention to in the process evaluation.



The Ethiopia baseline survey used five separate questionnaires that aimed to capture elements along the program impact pathways. These tools include 1) a household questionnaire, 2) a staff questionnaire of health extension workers (HEW), 3) a staff questionnaire of supervisors of HEWs, 4) a volunteer community health promoters (VCHP), and 5) a community questionnaire.


Three types of health staff questionnaires (HEW, VCHP, and supervisors) were applied to health staff who are closest to the community or work in the community.


In the Health Extension Program (HEP), the key frontline health workers (FHWs) are the health extension workers (HEWs).


The health extension workers (HEW) questionnaire (along with the other two health workers questionnaires (VCHP and supervisors)) aimed at assessing three major issues: 1) frequency of interactions between health staff and caregivers, and avenues for these interactions; 2) content of the discussion between caregivers and health staff, and the time spent on IYCF-related discussions; and 3) knowledge and training received by the health staff on IYCF. In addition, the frontline health worker questionnaires capture the organizational context within which FHWs deliver their interventions. These are captured by inclusion of questions on perceptions related to their workload and their level of satisfaction with their overall job. This is particularly important to capture volunteer workers who receive no salary.

Quantifying potential economic benefits of blast-resistant biofortified wheat in Bangladesh: The case of BARI Gom 33

For the first time in history, the emergence of wheat-blast in Bangladesh has generated major food security concerns. The Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute (BARI) together with the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) developed and released the wheat variety BARI Gom 33 that is resistant to wheat blast and other common diseases. The new variety provides a 5-8% yield gain over the available popular varieties, as well as being zinc enriched. This study examines the potential economic benefits of BARI Gom 33 in Bangladesh. First, applying a climate analogue model, this study identified that more than 55% of the total wheat area in Bangladesh (across 45 districts) is vulnerable to wheat blast. Second, applying an ex-ante impact assessment framework, this study shows that with an assumed cumulative adoption starting from 2019-20 increasing up to 30% by 2027, the potential economic benefits of the newly developed wheat variety by 2029-30, far exceeds its dissemination costs. Even if dissemination of the new wheat variety is limited to only the ten currently blast-affected districts, the yearly average net benefits amount to USD 0.23-1.6 million. Based on the findings, the international donor agencies are urged to support the national system in scaling out the new wheat variety and wheat research in general to ensure overall food security in South Asia.

Viet Nam Alive & Thrive Endline Survey 2014: Community and Facility

This dataset is the result of the community and facility assessment survey that was conducted to gather data at endline within the context of an overall evaluation of the franchise model for Alive & Thrive (A&T) in Viet Nam. The overall aims of the evaluation were to assess the impact of the franchise model on (1) age-appropriate IYCF practices among children <2 years of age and (2) stunting among children 2-5 years of age.



A&T is an initiative funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to reduce undernutrition and death caused by suboptimal IYCF practices in three countries (Viet Nam, Bangladesh, and Ethiopia) over a period of six years (2009-2014). The goal of A&T is to reduce avoidable death and disability due to suboptimal IYCF in the developing world by increasing exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) until 6 months of age and reducing the stunting of children under two years of age. A&T applied principles of social franchising within the government health system to deliver the interventions.



A&T’s Viet Nam strategy is designed to support improvements in infant and young child feeding (IYCF) in three key ways: (1) improving policy and regulatory environments; (2) shaping IYCF demand and practice; and (3) increasing supply, demand, and use of fortified complementary foods. In order to achieve this, the A&T Viet Nam program has been divided into three main focus areas namely advocacy, community, and the private sector. In addition, a communications component is integrated into each of these focus areas to support their activities.



A&T’s Viet Nam strategy is designed to support improvements in infant and young child feeding (IYCF) in three key ways: (1) improving policy and regulatory environments; (2) shaping IYCF demand and practice; and (3) increasing supply, demand, and use of fortified complementary foods. In order to achieve this, the A&T Viet Nam program has been divided into three main focus areas namely advocacy, community, and the private sector. In addition, a communications component is integrated into each of these focus areas to support their activities.



Among several activities, the franchise model is a core initiative of the community model to provide quality nutrition counseling to women and families at health facilities at all levels. Implemented in cooperation with the Vietnamese government and select private clinics, franchises delivered a package of focused IYCF counseling services to pregnant women, lactating mothers, and their families, based on a franchise service package. Focused training and capacity building for healthcare workers were undertaken to enable the health system to provide franchise services. Individualized services were supported through mass media campaigns aimed at generating demand for franchise services and promoting optimal IYCF practices.



The impact evaluation used a cluster-randomized controlled design with repeated cross-sectional baseline and endline surveys in the same communes within four provinces, Thai Nguyen, Thanh Hoa, Quang Ngai, and Vinh Long. The endline survey included three components—(i) household survey and anthropometric measurements of children and mothers, (ii) community and facility assessments survey, and (iii) frontline health workers survey. This community and facility assessment data provide information about each commune including general characteristics of the commune; distance from the nearest major town; natural disasters occurred in the commune; and equipment at the community health center level.

Viet Nam Alive & Thrive Process Evaluation Survey 2013: Commune General Information

This dataset is the result of the community survey conducted to gather data for process evaluation in the context of an overall evaluation of the franchise model for Alive & Thrive (A&T) in Viet Nam. The overall aims of the evaluation were to assess the impact of the franchise model on (1) age-appropriate IYCF practices among children <2 years of age and (2) stunting among children 2-5 years of age.



A&T is an initiative funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to reduce undernutrition and death caused by suboptimal IYCF practices in three countries (Viet Nam, Bangladesh, and Ethiopia) over a period of six years (2009-2014). The goal of A&T is to reduce avoidable death and disability due to suboptimal IYCF in the developing world by increasing exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) until 6 months of age and reducing the stunting of children under two years of age. A&T applied principles of social franchising within the government health system to deliver the interventions.



A&T’s Viet Nam strategy is designed to support improvements in infant and young child feeding (IYCF) in three key ways: (1) improving policy and regulatory environments; (2) shaping IYCF demand and practice; and (3) increasing supply, demand, and use of fortified complementary foods. In order to achieve this, the A&T Viet Nam program has been divided into three main focus areas namely advocacy, community, and the private sector. In addition, a communications component is integrated into each of these focus areas to support their activities.



Among several activities, the franchise model is a core initiative of the community model to provide quality nutrition counseling to women and families at health facilities at all levels. Implemented in cooperation with the Vietnamese government and select private clinics, franchises will deliver a package of focused IYCF counseling services to pregnant women, lactating mothers, and their families, based on a franchise service package. Focused training and capacity building for healthcare workers will be undertaken to enable the health system to provide franchise services. Individualized services will be supported through mass media campaigns aimed at generating demand for franchise services and promoting optimal IYCF practices.



The process evaluation survey was conducted in 40 communes across four provinces, Thai Nguyen, Thanh Hoa, Quang Ngai, and Vinh Long, between June and August 2013 by the IFPRI team in collaboration with the Institute of Social and Medicine Studies (ISMS). The survey included two major components—(i) household survey, and (ii) frontline health workers survey. The survey of frontline health workers (FHWs) included questionnaires for commune health centers (CHC) staff, village health workers (VHWs) involved in the A&T interventions, as well as a commune questionnaire. The
commune general information data are generated using commune questionnaire and provide information about the community such as number of villages in each commune, population, number of health facilities, number of personnel in the health facility, number of children under 5 years of age, and availability of information, communication, and education (IEC) items materials.

CCAFS-IMPACT Lite Survey Bangladesh, Satkhira District

IMPACT lite is a tool, developed by the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) that provides a unifying framework for collecting detailed information on farm resources, farm management strategies, farm productivity and household economics at the household-level.

The objective of this survey is to capture within-site variability on key livelihood indicators that could be used for a range of analysis including the modelling of impact of adaptation and mitigation strategies on livelihoods, food security and the environment. The survey was carried out in 13 other benchmark sites across East Africa, West Africa, and South Asia. IMPACT Lite data from Satkhira, Bangladesh were collected by IFPRI as part of the IFPRI-CCAFS Gender and Climate Change Survey Data.

Viet Nam Alive & Thrive Endline Survey 2014: Observation of Counseling Services

This dataset is the result of the frontline health workers survey that was conducted to gather data at endline within the context of an overall evaluation of the franchise model for Alive & Thrive (A&T) in Viet Nam. The overall aims of the evaluation were to assess the impact of the franchise model on (1) age-appropriate IYCF practices among children <2 years of age and (2) stunting among children 2-5 years of age.



A&T is an initiative funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to reduce undernutrition and death caused by suboptimal IYCF practices in three countries (Viet Nam, Bangladesh, and Ethiopia) over a period of six years (2009-2014). The goal of A&T is to reduce avoidable death and disability due to suboptimal IYCF in the developing world by increasing exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) until 6 months of age and reducing the stunting of children under two years of age. A&T applied principles of social franchising within the government health system to deliver the interventions.


A&T’s Viet Nam strategy is designed to support improvements in infant and young child feeding (IYCF) in three key ways: (1) improving policy and regulatory environments; (2) shaping IYCF demand and practice; and (3) increasing supply, demand, and use of fortified complementary foods. In order to achieve this, the A&T Viet Nam program has been divided into three main focus areas namely advocacy, community, and the private sector. In addition, a communications component is integrated into each of these focus areas to support their activities.



Among several activities, the franchise model is a core initiative of the community model to provide quality nutrition counseling to women and families at health facilities at all levels. Implemented in cooperation with the Vietnamese government and select private clinics, franchises delivered a package of focused IYCF counseling services to pregnant women, lactating mothers, and their families, based on a franchise service package. Focused training and capacity building for healthcare workers were undertaken to enable the health system to provide franchise services. Individualized services were supported through mass media campaigns aimed at generating demand for franchise services and promoting optimal IYCF practices.


The impact evaluation used a cluster-randomized controlled design with repeated cross-sectional baseline and endline surveys in the same communes within four provinces, Thai Nguyen, Thanh Hoa, Quang Ngai, and Vinh Long. The endline survey included three components—(i) household survey and anthropometric measurements of children and mothers, (ii) community and facility assessments survey, and (iii) frontline health workers survey. The survey of frontline health workers (FHWs) included questionnaires for commune health center (CHC) staff, village health workers (VHWs) involved in the A&T interventions, as well as a observation of counseling sessions questionnaire. This observation of counseling services data is collected by trained researchers through observations of counseling sessions in order to assess the CHC health staffs’ competence and performance during IYCF counseling. The counseling observation checklist was developed based on the IYCF service delivery package guidelines. In addition to content coverage, data collectors used a checklist to assess counselors’ skills and counseling processes as a way to measure the quality of the counseling session.

Viet Nam Alive & Thrive Process Evaluation Survey 2013: Village Health Workers (VHW)

This dataset is the result of the frontline health workers survey conducted to gather data for process evaluation in the context of an overall evaluation of the franchise model for Alive & Thrive (A&T) in Viet Nam. The overall aims of the evaluation were to assess the impact of the franchise model on (1) age-appropriate IYCF practices among children <2 years of age and (2) stunting among children 2-5 years of age.



A&T is an initiative funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to reduce undernutrition and death caused by suboptimal IYCF practices in three countries (Viet Nam, Bangladesh, and Ethiopia) over a period of six years (2009-2014). The goal of A&T is to reduce avoidable death and disability due to suboptimal IYCF in the developing world by increasing exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) until 6 months of age and reducing the stunting of children under two years of age. A&T applied principles of social franchising within the government health system to deliver the interventions.



A&T’s Viet Nam strategy is designed to support improvements in infant and young child feeding (IYCF) in three key ways: (1) improving policy and regulatory environments; (2) shaping IYCF demand and practice; and (3) increasing supply, demand, and use of fortified complementary foods. In order to achieve this, the A&T Viet Nam program has been divided into three main focus areas namely advocacy, community, and the private sector. In addition, a communications component is integrated into each of these focus areas to support their activities.



Among several activities, the franchise model is a core initiative of the community model to provide quality nutrition counseling to women and families at health facilities at all levels. Implemented in cooperation with the Vietnamese government and select private clinics, franchises will deliver a package of focused IYCF counseling services to pregnant women, lactating mothers, and their families, based on a franchise service package. Focused training and capacity building for healthcare workers will be undertaken to enable the health system to provide franchise services. Individualized services will be supported through mass media campaigns aimed at generating demand for franchise services and promoting optimal IYCF practices.



The process evaluation survey was conducted in 40 communes across four provinces, Thai Nguyen, Thanh Hoa, Quang Ngai, and Vinh Long, between June and August 2013 by the IFPRI team in collaboration with the Institute of Social and Medicine Studies (ISMS). The survey included two major components—(i) household survey, and (ii) frontline health workers survey. The survey of frontline health workers (FHWs) included questionnaires for commune health center (CHC) staff, village health workers (VHWs) involved in the A&T interventions, as well as a commune questionnaire. This village health workers (VHW) data provide information about a) health workers exposure to training and Behavior Change Communication (BCC) materials provided by the A&T program, b) their exposure to the A&T mass media, c) their knowledge and understanding about IYCF and nutrition, d) their work environment related to IYCF service delivery (motivation, supportive supervision, time commitments to different tasks, and the ability to integrate sustained IYCF counseling into daily routines).