Contribute to the Integration of Africa RISING (AR) Activities into Coherent Project Programmes

In collaboration with AR partners, contribute to the integration of R&D activities at project level and the joint planning & implementation of activities. This may include the following:

• In collaboration with Internal Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), plan and carry out nutrient analysis of crop residues suitable as animal feed such as broad beans residues and wheat straw (led by ILRI)

• In collaboration with International Center for tropical agriculture (CIAT), follow up on value chain work on priority crops and livestock and contribute to the development of value chain activities (led by CIAT)

• In collaboration with International Water Management Institute (IWMI), explore the use of small scale irrigation facilities for the production of high value crops such as potato during off season periods (led by IWMI)

• Identification and exploitation of potential synergies between International Potato Center’s (CIP) AR component and the Humid Tropics program

• Explore opportunities with International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) and national partners to initiate joint system level research and development (R&D) activities.


About the project

Project title: Contribute to the integration of AR activities into coherent project programmes

Project abstract

In 2014, participatory community analyses (PCA) were undertaken by multi-disciplinary facilitation teams in 8 kebeles in the Amhara, Tigray, Oromia and SNNPR regions, producing a list of priority farming enterprises, their current bottlenecks, as well as farmer-perceived opportunities for improving income, food security and/or reducing overall risks by intensifying farm enterprises. The PCA was carried out in discussions with kebele members and local leaders, with over 250 men, women and young people. Feedback on the results will be given to the farmers and future participatory planning and implementation of activities based on the results of the PCA and feedback sessions.

Project website: http://africa-rising.net

Project start date: 01/01/2014

Project end date : 12/31/2014

Promotion of Diffused Light Storage

This dataset includes constructed diffused light storage (DLS) number.

About the project

Project title: Promotion of Diffused Light Storage

Project abstract

Storage losses including impaired quality are partly caused by harvested crops not being stored in a product specific manner. Diffused Light Storage (DLS) is a post-harvest technology which uses natural indirect light instead of low temperature to control excessive sprout growth of potato seeds, extend their storage life, reduce the associated storage losses and improve productivity of the potato crop. It is a low cost method which provides a new opportunity for farmers to preserve the quality of seed potato. Quality Declared Planting Material (QDPM) is a value added product and must be stored in DLS.

Project website: http://africa-rising.net

Project start date: 01/01/2014

Project end date : 06/01/2014

Analysis of Soil Related Constraints for Sustainable Intensification

FAO estimates that agricultural intensification contributes about 80% of increased crop production in developing countries. Thus sustainable intensification (SI) will require, among other things, better use of land resources upon which production depends. This is critical given that most of the arable land in Africa has soil related problems, leading losses of nutrients and land cover (Heng et al. 2015). In this context improved land management is critical to overcoming soil related constraints to sustainable food production and in targeting agricultural interventions. However, limited availability of site-specific nutrient management guidelines for semi-arid zones in Tanzania undermines efforts to target technologies in the specific biophysical conditions in which smallholder farmers operate. Thus technologies adopted under these circumstances are risky as they may fail to address key drivers of enhanced crop production or land degradation. We characterized soils in Kongwa and Kiteto districts to assess fertility status and drivers of land degradation so as to inform the development of integrated land management options for SI under the Africa RISING project. This approach helps to link soil management recommendations to soil conditions and in targeting interventions./p>

About the project

Project title: Africa RISING- Intensification of Maize-Legume Based Systems in the Semi-Arid Areas of Tanzania to Increase Farm Productivity and Improve Farming Natural Resource Base

Project abstract

The aim of the Africa RISING project in Kongwa and Kiteto Districts, Tanzania is to provide a scientific basis for sustainably intensifying agricultural production in semi-arid areas of central Tanzania. The project activities are falls under 4 thematic areas that address three critical elements of sustainable intensification (SI), i.e. genetic, ecological and socio-economic intensification technologies. The scope of activities being implemented includes packaging of new legume and cereal varieties with over 120% yield advantage, packaging and validation of integrated productivity enhancing technologies for cereals, legumes, legume trees and soil health technologies, food safety primarily to reduce aflatoxin contamination and integration of livestock into the cropping systems. The innovation platform is used to set R4D priority in the active sites. In the 2013-2014 season, we reached out to about 1217 farmers Kongwa and Kiteto districts. In 2014 we plan to reach out to about 1500 new farmers. The project team is comprised of national partners (e.g. ARI-Hombolo, District Agricultural Officers, SUA and UDOM) and CG Partners (CIMMYT and ICRAF) under the leadership of ICRISAT.

Project website: http://africa-rising.net

Project start date: 05/1/2012

Project end date : 09/30/2016

Fertilizer Microdosing

Most farmers and extension officers in Tanzania use blanket fertilizer recommendations, which can be ineffective in sustaining crops productions. The most recent fertilizer recommendation report (Marandu et al., 2014) do not have guidelines for semiarid zones. Besides, developing agronomic rates (Mkoma, 2015), our work in 2016 seasons addressed the aspects of use efficiency and costs of fertilizer by refining the recommended rates into micro-dose rate. Fertilizer micro dosing involves application of small doses of fertilizer 5-6 kg P/ha (2-4g/hill as NPK) at sowing or shortly after germination to improve uptake or use efficiency and crops yields. The technique also holds high potential to reduce inputs costs because the amount of fertilizer is reduced substantially compared to recommended rate. Fertilizer micro-dosing trials were established in Mlali, Molet and Njoro villages during the 2016 growing seasons using the randomized complete block design (RCBD) with the three replications. Treatments include N (0, 15, 30 and 60 kg/ha) and P (0, 7.5, 15, and 30kg P/ha) in a factorial combination and the 16 treatment combinations were allocated randomly to each block. The test crop was maize, variety Staha. Maize was planted at 90 cm x 60 cm in Mlali and Molet villages and at a spacing of 75 cm x 60 cm in Njoro village. The plot size in both sites was 5 m x 6 m. This study includes data generated from this study trial.

About the project

Project title: Intensification of Maize-Legume Based Systems in the Semi-Arid Areas of Tanzania to Increase Farm Productivity and Improve Farming Natural Resource Base

Project abstract


The aim of the Africa RISING project in Kongwa and Kiteto Districts, Tanzania is to provide a scientific basis for sustainably intensifying agricultural production in semi-arid areas of central Tanzania. The project activities are falls under 4 thematic areas that address three critical elements of sustainable intensification (SI), i.e. genetic, ecological and socio-economic intensification technologies. The scope of activities being implemented include: packaging of new legume and cereal varieties with over 120% yield advantage, packaging and validation of integrated productivity enhancing technologies for cereals, legumes, legume trees and soil health technologies, food safety primarily to reduce aflatoxin contamination and integration of livestock into the cropping systems. The innovation platform is used to set R4D priority in the action sites. The project team is comprised of national partners (e.g. ARI-Hombolo, District Agricultural Officers, SUA and UDOM) and CG Partners (CIMMYT and ICRAF) under the leadership of ICRISAT.

Project website: http://africa-rising.net/where-we-work/west-africa/

Project start date: 2012-05-01

Project end date : 2016-09-30

Improved Crop Varieties, Agronomic Practices, Soil Water Conservation Practices

Establishment of demonstration plots on improved crop varieties (maize, groundnuts, soybeans and beans) and best-bet agronomic pratices and soil and water conservation practices in Babati, Kongwa, kiteto, Mvomero, Mbozi, Kilosa and Kilolo in Tanzania. Training of lead farmers and extension staff to empower them with knowledge on improved technologies so that they can also train others.

This study contains data from different cereal legume rotation systems in northern Ghana.

About the project

Project title: Enhancing Partnership among Africa RISING (AR), NAFAKA and TUBORESHE CHAKULA (TUBOCHA) Programs for Fast-Tracking Delivery and Scaling of Agricultural Technologies in Tanzania

Project abstract


This project is implemented in partnership between Africa RISING research team and NAFAKA and focuses on scaling of agricultural technologies that include deployment of improved maize varieties and legumes (beans, soybean, groundnuts), deployment of improved water and soil conservation practices and improved good agricultural practices in Babati, Kongwa, Kiteto, Kilosa, Mvomero, Mbozi and Kilolo districts of Tanzania. The project is implemented by CIMMYT, IITA, CIAT, ICRAF, ARI-Hombolo, AMINATA Quality Seeds compnay, Meru Agro-Tours and Cosultants seed company, NAFAKA and Selian Agricultural Research Institute.

Project website: http://africa-rising.net

Project start date: 01/01/2014

Project end date : 09/30/2017

Africa RISING Tanzania- Simulating Adoption Study

Sustainable intensification represents one of the best options for enhanced crop productivity in many fragile ecosystems. However, limited uses of sustainable production intensification technologies such as Integrated Soil Fertility Management technologies to address challenges to crop and livestock productivity including soil fertility challenge is strongly associated with declining agricultural productivity and increasing rural poverty. The Africa RISING project is being implemented in Kongwa and Kiteto districts of Tanzania to respond to challenges that hamper agricultural productivity in semi-arid of selected two districts of Tanzania using three sets of technologies. These are: (i) Integrated Soil Fertility Management technologies, (ii) physical and biological barriers for erosion control through adoption of tie ridges locally known as ’fanya juu’/ ‘fanya chini’; iii) physical barriers for erosion control (ripping and tied-ridging) and enhancing range, lands and livestock productivity.It has been known for long time that the success of any project depends, in part, on whether farmers adopt the offered technologies and, if they do, whether those farmers adopt the technologies in an ideal combination, and for the prescribed length of time needed to produce designed results. While studying the adoption of technologies after a project has ended has been a common practice, the well-established adoption theory and literature explain the importance of studying and predicting adoption in the early stage of the project in fostering a more complete understanding of the attributes of technologies and how they influence adoption and diffusion which in turn helps to allow the attributes of the technologies or the extension strategy to be modified so that levels of adoption and diffusion can be improved. Therefore, the adoption study was conducted to simulate adoption peak level of technologies to guide scaling up decisions and implementation strategy.

About the project

Project title: Africa RISING

Project abstract


The aim of the Africa RISING project in Kongwa and Kiteto Districts, Tanzania is to provide a scientific basis for sustainable intensifying agricultural production in semi-arid areas of central Tanzania. The project activities are falls under 4 thematic areas that address three critical elements of sustainable intensification (SI), i.e. genetic, ecological and socio-economic intensification technologies. The scope of activities being implemented include: packaging of new legume and cereal varieties with over 120% yield advantage, packaging and validation of integrated productivity enhancing technologies for cereals, legumes, legume trees and soil health technologies, food safety primarily to reduce aflatoxin contamination and integration of livestock into the cropping systems. The innovation platform is used to set R4D priority in the action sites. In the 2013-2014 season, we reached out to about 1217 farmers Kongwa and Kiteto districts. In 2014 we plan to reach out to about 1500 new farmers. The project team is comprised of national partners (e.g. ARI-Hombolo, District Agricultural Officers, SUA and UDOM) and CG Partners (CIMMYT and ICRAF) under the leadership of ICRISAT.

Project website: http://africa-rising.net

Project start date: 05/01/2012

Project end date : 09/30/2016

Reaching end users (REU) socioeconomic endline survey 2009, Mozambique

Between 2006 and 2009, HarvestPlus conducted the Reaching End Users (REU) project in Mozambique and Uganda. The objective of the project was to distribute the first biofortified crop with high micronutrient density, provitamin A-rich orange-fleshed sweet potato (OFSP). HarvestPlus selected regions of Uganda and Mozambique for this initiative because in these areas of each country white- or yellow-fleshed sweet potato is either the staple crop (Uganda) or an important secondary source of starch (Mozambique). The project strategy involved conducting a coordinated three-pronged approach to encourage adoption and consumption of OFSP including: (i) vine distribution and agricultural extension (seed systems), (ii) demand creation through nutrition trainings; and (iii) trainings in marketing and product development. HarvestPlus planned to reach over 10,000 farming household in each country, but also wanted to use this opportunity to learn about how the impact and cost-effectiveness of integrated dissemination strategies of differing intensity. The data were used for a rigorous impact evaluation and cost-effectiveness study of the REU OFSP project conducted from 2006-2009 in Mozambique, and the 2012 data were collected to understand how adoption and dietary intakes had evolved.

HarvestPlus collaborated with the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) and the International Potato Center (CIP) to design and implement a randomized-controlled evaluation during the implementation of the REU project in each country. The point of intervention for the REU project included local farmer groups in Uganda and more loosely organized community or church-based groups in Mozambique. Before the intervention, these groups were sampled for the evaluation study and group members with young children were randomly selected for the evaluation household sample. Baseline surveys were conducted in the sampled church groups in Mozambique in 2006. The baseline included a detailed socioeconomic and agricultural survey as well as a nutrition and dietary intake survey. The dietary intake survey included 24-hour dietary recall interviews to measure intakes of vitamin A and other nutrients of target groups of young children and women in the sample. As a basis for identifying impact through the evaluation, sampled farmer groups or church groups were randomly assigned into one of three intervention arms: the intensive 2-3 year intervention (Model 1), a less intensive intervention with reduced activity after the first year (Model 2) and a Control group. In 2009, endline surveys were conducted in Mozambique, and in 2012, the communities were visited a third time, three years after the intervention had left.

CELL5M: A Multidisciplinary Geospatial Database for Africa South of the Sahara

Spatially-explicit data is increasingly becoming available across disciplines, yet they are often limited to a specific domain. In order to use such datasets in a coherent analysis, such as to decide where to target specific types of agricultural investment, there should be an effort to make such datasets harmonized and interoperable. For Africa South of the Sahara (SSA) region, the HarvestChoice CELL5M Database was developed in this spirit of moving multidisciplinary data into one harmonized, geospatial database. The database includes over 750 biophysical and socio-economic indicators, many of which can be easily expanded to global scale. The CELL5M database provides a platform for cross-cutting spatial analyses and fine-grain visualization of the mix of farming systems and populations across SSA. It was created as the central core to support a decision-making platform that would enable development practitioners and researchers to explore multi-faceted spatial relationships at the nexus of poverty, health and nutrition, farming systems, innovation, and environment. The database is a matrix populated by over 350,000 grid cells covering SSA at five arc-minute spatial resolution. Users of the database, including those conduct researches on agricultural policy, research, and development issues, can also easily overlay their own indicators. Numerical aggregation of the gridded data by specific geographical domains, either at subnational level or across country borders for more regional analysis, is also readily possible without needing to use any specific GIS software. See the HCID database (http://dx.doi.org/10.7910/DVN/MZLXVQ) for the geometry of each grid cell. The database also provides standard-compliant data API that currently powers several web-based data visualization and analytics tools.

Evaluating Fertilizer Recommendations with Farmers

The Africa RISING program adopts the mother-baby trial approach to test, validate and disseminate research results. Under this approach farmers have been exposed to the technologies tested and validated on-farm (mother trials). Thereafter, farmers are given the opportunity to experiment technology they chose on their farms (baby trials) after a training. In this context, ICRAF and partners developed fertilizer recommendations (30 kg P/ha and 60 kg N/ha) for maize in semi-arid Tanzania during the 2013 and 2014 growing seasons. Farmers were involved to test these rates widely in their fields (as baby plots) when integrated with improve maize varieties and different types of fertilizers. Fertilizer tested were Minjingu and Yara Mila Cereals fertilizers and maize varieties were Staha, Kilima, SEED Co and a local variety known as Gunzi Jekundu. The work started with training farmers on promising fertilizer technologies and good agronomic practices (GAP) during the beginning of the 2015 (293 farmers) and 2016 seasons (682 farmers). About 605 farmers (55% Male and 45% Female) who attended training in 2016 established baby trials to validate fertilizer-maize variety technologies. Each baby farmers had a max of four plots assessing performance of improved maize variety and local variety with and without Minjingu (Nafaka Plus for basal application at planting and Minjingu top dressing) or Yara Mila Cereal fertilizers. Yara Mila Cereal was used for a basal and top dressing applications as per guideline printed in the fertilizer bag and from the company’s agronomist.This data study contains data produced from these trials.

About the project

Project title: Intensification of Maize-Legume Based Systems in the Semi-Arid Areas of Tanzania to Increase Farm Productivity and Improve Farming Natural Resource Base

Project abstract


The aim of the Africa RISING project in Kongwa and Kiteto Districts, Tanzania is to provide a scientific basis for sustainably intensifying agricultural production in semi-arid areas of central Tanzania. The project activities are falls under 4 thematic areas that address three critical elements of sustainable intensification (SI), i.e. genetic, ecological and socio-economic intensification technologies. The scope of activities being implemented include: packaging of new legume and cereal varieties with over 120% yield advantage, packaging and validation of integrated productivity enhancing technologies for cereals, legumes, legume trees and soil health technologies, food safety primarily to reduce aflatoxin contamination and integration of livestock into the cropping systems. The innovation platform is used to set R4D priority in the action sites. The project team is comprised of national partners (e.g. ARI-Hombolo, District Agricultural Officers, SUA and UDOM) and CG Partners (CIMMYT and ICRAF) under the leadership of ICRISAT.

Project website: http://africa-rising.net/where-we-work/west-africa/

Project start date: 2012-05-01

Project end date : 2016-09-30

Africa RISING Tanzania- Integrated Pest Management (IPM) of Vegetables

This study contains data on pest and disease incidence.

About the project

Project title: Africa RISING

Project abstract

The aim of the Africa RISING project in Kongwa and Kiteto Districts, Tanzania is to provide a scientific basis for sustainably intensifying agricultural production in semi-arid areas of central Tanzania. The project activities are falls under 4 thematic areas that address three critical elements of sustainable intensification (SI), i.e. genetic, ecological and socio-economic intensification technologies. The scope of activities being implemented includes: packaging of new legume and cereal varieties with over 120% yield advantage, packaging and validation of integrated productivity-enhancing technologies for cereals, legumes, legume trees and soil health technologies, food safety primarily to reduce aflatoxin contamination and integration of livestock into the cropping systems. The innovation platform is used to set R4D priority in the active sites. In the 2013-2014 season, we reached out to about 1217 farmers Kongwa and Kiteto districts. In 2014 we plan to reach out to about 1500 new farmers. The project team is comprised of national partners (e.g. ARI-Hombolo, District Agricultural Officers, SUA and UDOM) and CG Partners (CIMMYT and ICRAF) under the leadership of ICRISAT.

Project website: http://africa-rising.net

Project start date: 5/1/2012

Project end date : 9/30/2016